A Pieceful Life

A Pieceful Life

Welcome

I'm so glad that you stopped by, and hope that you enjoy your visit. Here you will find pieces of my life - quilting, cross-stitch, family, travel, friends.
My name is Peg - I am a 60ish wife, mother, daughter, sister, aunt, cousin, friend - and if we're not already related or friends, hope to become your friend too.
We live in the eastern end of the beautiful Fraser Valley, about 1.5 hours east of Vancouver, BC. Empty nesters, we have one son living just a few minutes away, our other son and daughter live in Alberta.
Comments are always welcome, always read - and answered if need be. Feel free to share, I love hearing from all my cyber-space friends.
Please do check out some of the links in my side-bar - you'll find other bloggers and fabulous people to visit.

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Chicken (Sheep/Monkey) Dance Anyone?

A couple of posts ago, I mentioned that when we were in Barkerville, we took in a revue.  025     

I happened to be sitting in the right/wrong spot at the right/wrong time – and was asked to ‘help’ with one of the songs.048

I was partnered with a vibrant young man: 047

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who had me acting like a chicken:043 sheep:045

and monkey:DSCF5039  – my 15 minutes of fame!!!

Happy follies.              Blessings, Peg

Monday, September 27, 2010

How does a blogger live without a camera?

While on our vacation, last day, our camera quit working!!  It would turn on, but no display on the monitor or in the view finder.  It wouldn’t turn off, either – had to remove the battery, and reinsert it and then it would automatically turn off.  So, it’s in the shop.

Our answer to that dilemma – we resurrected our old camera (thankfully we kept it).   But it’s just barely functioning – won’t hold a charge, turns itself off sometimes immediately after turning on, sometimes we get a display, sometimes not.  It’s been a rough week LOL!

And then, the computer started doing funny things.  I spent a whole afternoon trying to talk to tech support, to get no help whatsoever in the end.  The suggestion was that we needed a new splitter, but when we connected directly, that still didn’t solve the problem.  Part of the discussion included the availability of a wireless router/modem, which would allow us to use both of our laptops at the same time.  So I went out and got a wireless router.  That seems to have solved the problem, so in the end I guess the modem just got tired of working.

But struggling with the lack of a camera has made life different for this blogger.  Pictures on my last post were with the old camera, as are these today– we’re limping along, and trying to decide if we should get a new battery-pack, or just look for a cheap camera so we have a back-up.  Any good suggestions?

Still no quilting happening – but the preserving continues.  Thought you might get a kick out of this – because we have a ceramic-top stove, we can’t put the canner on it.  So we’ve rigged up a propane stove (beside WIDE-open windows):

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And this weekend we got some salmon in jars:

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We took some time out and visited our local show garden – might be the last chance this season, and then went to a near-by Christmas shop for their preview sale (by invitation only):005

We had a great visit with the folks there, picked up a few more Christmas decorations (as if we needed them LOL), and just as we were finishing, some old friends arrived to do their shopping – so we sat after and had a great visit and catch-up, enjoying the complimentary snacks and wine.

On our way to the shop, we passed a sign that said ‘Quilts and Fudge’.  The local community center decided to do an impromptu, small craft fair and catch some of the folks driving by to the Christmas shop.  They had some great things, and we picked up a couple of gifts

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And brought home some fudge:

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So despite having to be innovative, we are still managing to get things done, have some relaxation time, and take pictures, too!

Happy blogging!!     Blessings, Peg

Thursday, September 23, 2010

Just for you, Sis

On our last two trips, we’ve had the opportunity to appreciate some of the history found in cemeteries.  My sister and I are taphophiles, which means we like to visit cemeteries.  Last summer we visited a couple together.  This post is to share with her, the graveyards I visited this summer.

In June, we traveled along the Oregon Coast, where DH and I found the Fort Stevens military cemetery.

The tidy rows of gravestones demonstrated military organization at its finest:

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Father and son buried back-to-back, with their epitaphs on either side of the same headstone:

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And children commemorated simply:

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In Barkerville, the cemetery is much more casual, established in 1863 when ‘they took (his) body to the side of the hill and buried him there’ :

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Some plots are simply marked:

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Others are much more formal:

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In recent years, several headstones have been renewed:

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But many plots are marked by a simple white cross with no name to designate the person laid at that spot:

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So, sis, I hope you’ve enjoyed these cemetery crawls – maybe we can do another one together soon.

Happy crawling.            Blessings, Peg

Quilting on vacation

While on our recent trailer trip, I took along some handiwork to keep me busy when the weather didn’t cooperate for out-of-doors relaxing.

I finished the binding on the following two projects:

A table runner for the trailer – using fabrics given to me by my sister-in-law (thanks, L – these are wonderful fabrics and there’s more for another project sometime soon):

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A lap quilt/wall-hanging (not sure how I want to use this, or if I’ll give it away), scrappy, using the patterns from a Mystery Bible quilt that’s been sitting in my binder for a number of years:

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We stopped at a few quilt shops along the way:

Near Lone Butte:

DSCN1544 - owned by an amazing septuagenarian who really does have busy fingers, judging by the amount of stock in her little shop:

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At Oliver, Miss Molly’s has changed hands and is now Heather’s Threadz – we were there on opening day:

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In Penticton:

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In Grand Forks, we found three

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None of the owners was too keen on having pictures taken inside, but trust me – they all had wonderful quilts on display, and fabric candy sufficient to satisfy any quilter’s appetite.

We got to Wine Country Quilts after my camera quit working – it’s just north of Oliver, and a great place to visit and watch the long-arm at work!

My purchases were modest:

100_5789 An apron panel for a friend, some veggie fabrics for a sometime table cover I have in mind, some fat quarters for a set of table toppers, and a table runner pattern.

Happy quilting.                Blessings, Peg

More travel

After we left Barkerville, we headed back south seeking some warmer climate.  Our first stop was at Lake Sheridan, where we took a couple of days just to relax and enjoy the beauty of our countryside.

On the way, we saw a cow moose with her calf:

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We stopped at this church to check out the workmanship of the stucco that the men had done some 30+ years ago:

05  It’s still in amazingly good shape.

This warning made us smile as we left the parking lot:

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Beautiful Lake Sheridan:

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After our R&R, we headed even further south, destination, the Okanagan Valley.  Passing through beautiful lake country:

DSCN1548 we also drove through some of the areas where forest fires had endangered lives and left the landscape devastated:

DSCN1555 We were amazed at how close to civilization these fires had come!

We stayed near Oliver, and explored all around the Okanagan and down into Border Country.  At Osoyoos, we visited the Miniature Railway (so many pictures that will have to wait for another post)

This house caught our eye at Okanagan Falls:

DSCN1629The house itself is fabulous and the view of the mountains and Okanagan Lake from here are breathtaking, but we couldn’t get onto their roof-top patios to get pics.  We did get some of the view at the vineyards near Naramata:

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This old hotel at Kaleden was gutted by fire many years ago, and now is a home for the birds of the area:

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The lower floor windows are all fenced off to protect any curious who might want to try to get inside, and the doorway has been sealed off with some imagination:

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We also visited the N’k’mip (say Inkameep) reserve to check out their campgrounds and winery.  This band is famous for its innovative and energetic ways of maintaining their independence:

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On our way to Border Country, we had to stop at the viewpoint overlooking Osoyoos and Oroville in the US (on the right):

DSCN1650This is one of my favorite views in the country!

We went to Grand Forks to visit the hotel:

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And get some borscht and other Russian goodies for which they are famous – and enjoyed a beautiful sunny lunch in a nearby park:

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The sight of people feeding the deer is apparently a common one in this area, and has put the wildlife  at risk as they no longer forage for themselves:

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Our trip ended with a rainy day for the drive home.  Our camera quit working on the last day, and is in now for repairs (fingers crossed – and thankful that all of the pictures were on a card that I could download to the computer).

More to come.  Happy trails.   Blessings, Peg

A trip back in time

After our weekend in Calgary, we headed back to BC to join our friends with our trailers for a 2-week trip.  Our first destination, Barkerville – a former gold rush town, now preserved as a living museum town in northwest BC.

But first we stopped at Hat Creek Ranch, a historic ranch also an active memory of former times:

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We rode the stage coach, and gained a new appreciation for soft seats and shock absorbers  in our vehicles of today:

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Cowboys were on hand to demonstrate the lifestyle of ranching in the early 1900s:

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Chickens and Mia the Sicilian donkey are still part of the farming activities here:

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Then on to Barkerville.  Where we ‘toured’ 1868:

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Learned how a Cornish waterwheel was used to pull the gold-bearing waters out from underground:

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And were invited to ‘invest’ in the mine:

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Got a lesson in playing Faro:

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Heard about the frustrations of the suffragettes:

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And took in a revue:

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Where they even got me on stage, acting like a chicken no less (sorry haven’t received a picture from my SIL who was apparently happily snapping away while I made a fool of myself).

Happy time travel.  Blessings, Peg